Bakery Internship, Art Program Create Safe Haven for Youth After Election

swtgeneration : To our youth - black, Latino, Muslim, LGBTQ, female, immigrant,  In our classroom, there are no walls and your life matters. Men cannot grab you, you are not a terrorist, drug-dealer, rapist. Your sexuality and gender will not be questioned or persecuted.

swtgeneration: To our youth - black, Latino, Muslim, LGBTQ, female, immigrant, 
In our classroom, there are no walls and your life matters. Men cannot grab you, you are not a terrorist, drug-dealer, rapist. Your sexuality and gender will not be questioned or persecuted.

EAST VILLAGE — Sweet Generation, a First Avenue bakery with a social justice streak, is using its internship program to give city youth a voice and a safe haven after an election that has left them fearful, the shop's owner and founder said.

The bakery's RISE youth internship, which recruits youth aged 16 to 24 from city schools and nonprofit groups to work in the shop while participating in career training and workshops, most recently teamed up with Lower East Side arts organization Fourth Arts Block to create a mural on the storefront's metal pull-down gates.

The mural reflects the students' hopes and dreams for the future — including landmarks such as the Eiffel Tower from a student striving for a career in architecture and a cupcake from an aspiring pastry chef — but also reflects the students' desire for peace and unity, which has come to the forefront of discussion since the presidential election, said bakery founder and owner Amy Chasan, pointing to the peace sign emerging from the mural's painted clouds. 

"That's where the peace sign came from, just that desire for harmony," explained Chasan, who said her students, all minorities, had expressed fears for the future in the wake of President-elect Donald Trump's victory and the reported uptick in hate crimes.

"In this mural project is when the youth started opening up about how it impacted them and how they thought about this city, which they love a lot," said Chasan. "I think what a lot of them felt, and it's what we hear from this generation, is it's really frustrating that bigotry like this exists and there’s no reason for it — why can't people just be themselves and everybody be OK with that?"

"It’s scary to think about being in a place where they aren’t safe, where they feel hate and exclusion."

Chasan has taken to the business's social media to reinforce her commitment to serving her students and making her bakery a safe place for them.

Click here for the full article on DNAinfo.

Spread the #ArtLove: Help Bring Project Attica's Artivism Workshop to Chiapas, Mexico

Project Attica collaborates with Agroarte, a collective that unites agriculture, art and hip-hop for community empowerment and building resistance against oppression in the community. Based in Medellin, Colombia, Agroarte takes over abandoned and neglected spaces teaching the youth about urban agriculture and self-expression through music and lyrics. Read more  here .  Video still by Lorena Acevedo.

Project Attica collaborates with Agroarte, a collective that unites agriculture, art and hip-hop for community empowerment and building resistance against oppression in the community. Based in Medellin, Colombia, Agroarte takes over abandoned and neglected spaces teaching the youth about urban agriculture and self-expression through music and lyrics. Read more here. Video still by Lorena Acevedo.

Project Attica has recently established partnerships with local organizations in Chiapas, Mexico and plan to conduct Artivism workshops in the community and contribute in the work to maintain indigenous cultural heritage in the face of growing violence and opposition. Since 2011, Project Attica has brought Artivism - a free, dynamic, visual art, interactive workshop to to students in NYC. Click here to see where our work has taken us. Held in middle schools, high schools and community organizations in New York City and abroad, Artivism provides participants with a space to create works of art by expressing their views about social justice issues on wearable canvases. Our costs are defrayed by grants and individual donations.

In order to bring Artivism to Chiapas, we started a Kickstarter campaign to help us raise funds for the trip. Check out our Instagram page here and our Facebook page here. Please help us spread the word and help us reach our fundraising goal. 

Long-secret Stingray Manuals Detail How Police Can Spy on Phones

Photo: U.S. Patent and Trade Office.

Photo: U.S. Patent and Trade Office.

Harris Corp.'s Stingray surveillance device has been one of the most closely guarded secrets in law enforcement for more than 15 years. The company and its police clients across the United States have fought to keep information about the mobile phone-monitoring boxes from the public against which they are used. The Intercept has obtained several Harris instruction manuals spanning roughly 200 pages and meticulously detailing how to create a cellular surveillance dragnet.

Harris has fought to keep its surveillance equipment, which carries price tags in the low six figures, hidden from both privacy activists and the general public, arguing that information about the gear could help criminals. Accordingly, an older Stingray manual released under the Freedom of Information Act to news website TheBlot.com last year was almost completely redacted. So too have law enforcement agencies at every level, across the country, evaded almost all attempts to learn how and why these extremely powerful tools are being used — though court battles have made it clear Stingrays are often deployed without any warrant. The San Bernardino Sheriff’s Department alone has snooped via Stingray, sans warrant, over 300 times.

Richard Tynan, a technologist with Privacy International, told The Intercept that the “manuals released today offer the most up-to-date view on the operation of” Stingrays and similar cellular surveillance devices, with powerful capabilities that threaten civil liberties, communications infrastructure, and potentially national security. He noted that the documents show the “Stingray II” device can impersonate four cellular communications towers at once, monitoring up to four cellular provider networks simultaneously, and with an add-on can operate on so-called 2G, 3G, and 4G networks simultaneously.

And the Harris software isn’t just extremely powerful, Tynan added, but relatively simple, providing any law enforcement agent with a modicum of computer literacy the ability to spy on large groups of people:

The ease with which the StingRay II can be used is quite striking and there do not seem to be any technical safeguards against misuse. … It also allows the operator to configure virtually every aspect of the operation of the fake cell tower. … The Gemini platform also allows for the logging and analysis of data to and from the network and “Once a message to/from any active subscriber in the Subscriber list is detected, Gemini will notify the user.” How many innocent communications of the public are analyzed during this process?

Tynan also raised questions about the extent to which Stingrays may be disrupting the communications infrastructure, including existing cellular towers.

Click here for the full article on The Intercept.

 

#ProjectAttica Participates in #Mural-making activity with Elemento Ilegal Eskuela de Hip Hop at La Comuna 8 in Medellin, Colombia

On Sunday September 11, 2016 we went to La Comuna 8 in Medellin, Colombia.  La Comuna 8 is located in the eastern center of Medellin.   La Comuna 8 is immense and the area were we our artivism and mural-making was in the neighborhoods of Golondrinas and El Faro.  A large part of the efforts of Elemento Ilegal as a school is to empower the territory, these two neighborhoods specifically.  The displacement suffered by these neighborhoods has many causes the local military, criminal groups, and paramilitary groups are some of thoses causes. 

Together with Elemento Ilegal Eskuela de Hip Hop we met and discussed ways to spread artivism in these territories amid adversities as a form of resistance. 


Would you like to host one of our Artivism workshops at your school or non-profit? We would love to hear from you! Contact us!

Since 2011, Project Attica has brought Artivism – a free, dynamic, visual art, interactive workshop to students in New York City. Held in middle schools, high schools and community organizations in the city, Artivism provides students with a space to create works of art by expressing their views about social justice issues on wearable canvases.

Photos from our #Artivism Workshop at Centro de Desarrollo Cultural de Moravia in Medellin, Colombia

We have been spreading the message of Artivism in Colombia!

We were able to follow up with the Centro de Desarrollo Cultural de Moravia in Medellin, Colombia in order to engage their participants with our artivism workshop.  When we did our first artivism workshop with the Centro Cultural de Moravia, earlier this year, we focused our group discussion on the ongoing peace process that the government of Colombia had going on at the time.

Now that Colombia has actually signed a peace agreement with the FARC there is a lot of controversial issues surrounding the peace agreement, which will be open to a public referundum.  Our artivism workshop invited the participants to grapple with those controversial issues to stimulate critical thinking through art. 


Would you like to host one of our Artivism workshops at your school or non-profit? We would love to hear from you! Contact us!

Since 2011, Project Attica has brought Artivism – a free, dynamic, visual art, interactive workshop to students in New York City. Held in middle schools, high schools and community organizations in the city, Artivism provides students with a space to create works of art by expressing their views about social justice issues on wearable canvases.