art

Youth Art Will Be on Full Display for #SoulBasel in #Overtown

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MIAMI – Each year, Art Basel spans three continents and on December 7-10, 2017 it will grace both the shores of Miami and the Historic African American Overtown Community as it does annually.

And youth from Urgent, Inc.’s Rites of Passage, FACE (Film, Arts, Coding & Entrepreneurship) and After School Programs will showcase their talents as part of the Soul Basel experience in Overtown, with, “Our Voice Matters,” a  multi-media collection of art, photography, film and more.

This exhibition is made possible thanks to The Children’s Trust, The Black Archives History and Research Foundation, Greater Miami Convention and Visitors Bureau and Miami Dade County.

The voices of youth made possible through the arts will be celebrated for 3-days featuring the work of young artists and filmmakers ages 5-21, and their grandparents too.

The festivities are open to the public, for more information visit here. If you go:

  • Opening Gallery Reception- Thursday, December 7, 3-6pm at the Historic Ward Rooming House Gallery, 249 NW 9th St, Miami, FL 33136. Includes a guided artwork, interactive Photo Booth and youth entrepreneur pop up shop. Presented in partnership with The Black Archives History and Research Foundation.
  • Youth Film Night- Friday, December 8, 4-7pm on the first floor of the Cambridge Innovation Center (CIC), 1951 NW 7th Avenue, Miami, FL  33136. Includes youth film screening, popcorn and drinks for $5.  Presented in partnership with Florida Film House.

Community Arts Day- Saturday, December 9, 1-4pm at the Historic Ward Rooming House. Includes a fun-filled afternoon of spoken word, dance, music, art project and so much more.  Presented in partnership with Path to Hip Hop.

Exhibit showcases art of #NativeAmerican youth

For more than 35 years, the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center has supported our next generation of indigenous artists with the annual Native American Student Art Show. The event encourages students to express their personal creativity while reflecting upon their deep-rooted history and traditions. This juried art show is open to Native American students in grades Pre-K through 12.

For more than 35 years, the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center has supported our next generation of indigenous artists with the annual Native American Student Art Show. The event encourages students to express their personal creativity while reflecting upon their deep-rooted history and traditions. This juried art show is open to Native American students in grades Pre-K through 12.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE) – An exhibition opened today that shows off the creativity of New Mexico’s Native American young people.

The Native American Student Art Show is an annual event featuring works from K through 12 students across the state.

Any Native American student can submit a piece and winners are chosen by a jury.

Some of the art is also for sale, with proceeds going right back to the students.

The show is in the 38th year. This year’s theme is “The Power of Stories.”

“It’s a Native-relevant topic and so it’s something they can come together and kind of think about and put themselves down on a piece of paper saying ‘this is what I think about storytelling.’ or ‘this is a story that means a lot to me’ and I want to share that,” said Rachel Moore, curator at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center.

The show runs every day from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. through January 5 at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center on 12th Street near Menaul.

More here.

More ‘inclusive and inspiring’ #publicart expected with city’s plan in #Chicago

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For Kamelia Hristeva, founder and CEO of Green Star Movement, art is about more than paint on walls or the tedium that can come from piecing a mosaic together.

“It creates a sense of place making, a place that’s inclusive and inspiring,” said Hristeva, whose non-profit, art-focused group is responsible for murals, sculptures and mosaics on elementary schools and underpasses throughout the city

“When you beautify a place people care more, it connects to people and helps them connect to different communities and learn about them.”

Through the city’s 50×50 neighborhood art project, Green Star Movement has been involved in creating murals at 65th and 67th Streets and at Belmont and Kenmore Avenues as well as other artworks.

And now more artists will get the opportunity to showcase their art in the city through Chicago’s first public art plan, which aims to showcase and generate more artwork in public spaces.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel on Friday announced the plan  – a collaboration between the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events, Department of Transportation, the Chicago Park District, Chicago Public Libraries and the Chicago Transit Authority among others.

“It’s the 50 year anniversary of the Wall of Respect and the Picasso sculpture. Those are reflection points for us in charting the history of Chicago and writing a new history,” the mayor said.

“We want to bring the city’s artists together to re-envision our spaces because they are places where we can bring people of different backgrounds together and create a common foundation.”

Teacher #GiannaRodriguez helps kids across #Baltimore transform themselves through #art

Image: Bruce Weller.

Image: Bruce Weller.

After school in a Baltimore art space, a dozen kids lean over canvases, their hands busy. One draws the word rookie in graffiti script, the o's doubling as eyes on a cartoon face. Another puts the finishing touches on a pair of tattooed, praying hands.

These students, many of whom have spent time in juvenile detention or jail, are exploring their talents and earning extra money through Baltimore Youth Arts (BYA), a nonprofit founded by 32-year-old artist-educator Gianna Rodriguez.

At BYA's Community Studio, Gianna and other instructors offer classes on fine arts, creative writing, DJing and life and career skills, such as registering for an ID and drafting a résumé. The kids, who act as apprentices, are paid $10 for every hour they attend class or work in the studio. During the summer they sell paintings and screen-printed clothing in local galleries and on BYA's website. They keep 70% to 90% of their profits, and the rest goes toward supplies.

"Kids sometimes resort to illegal activities when they need money," says Gianna. "We want to create opportunities so they can step back from that."

Gianna grew up as an artist and dancer, but also had brushes with a tougher crowd. "People close to me went to prison and some struggled with substance abuse," she says. "But my mother taught me to see the best in others."

For more than six years, Gianna taught art to at-risk and incarcerated young people in her hometown of Providence, RI. Then, after earning her master's degree in arts education in 2015, she moved to Baltimore and established BYA. Today, the organization reaches about forty 7- to 22-year-olds per week in detention and recreation centers, in addition to the studio. All told, BYA has worked with more than 250 kids in the past two years. Private foundations help pay for supplies and instructors, and Gianna earns a full-time salary through a fellowship.

Many of Gianna's students tell her that before joining the organization they'd never had an interest in art, been exposed to painting or drawing, or had help with life skills.

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#DumpsterArt: Artists beautify city

Image: LaShaunda Jordan. Charlie's Angels work on dumpster to beautify the city.

Image: LaShaunda Jordan. Charlie's Angels work on dumpster to beautify the city.

VALDOSTA — The second annual dumpster art project was held Saturday in the City Hall Annex parking lot. 

The project was made possible through a collaborative effort between the City of Valdosta, Valdosta Main Street, the Annette Howell Turner Center for the Arts and the Public Arts Advisory Committee.

Artist and artist teams transformed four downtown dumpsters into public pieces of art.

The team painting Dumpster No. 1 were employees from Barnes Healthcare Services; “Charlie’s Angels,” was named after Charlie Barnes III, owner of Barnes Healthcare Services. The team was led by Karen Lewis, a fine arts graduate of Valdosta State University.

“It’s a visual of our history. A visual of what makes Valdosta. Most people know Valdosta as being Winnersville football town and that tradition is what most people associate it with. We wanted to bring something to life that celebrated everything, you can really look at this and tell what Valdosta is all about,” Lewis said.

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